Corruption Risk Report Card
Rank among 50 states: 35th

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The story behind the score

New Hampshire scored relatively well in executive accountability, but its campaign finance and lobbyist reporting requirements are among the areas that could stand improvement. Read more from SII State Reporter Jon Greenberg.

Latest state news for New Hampshire

State integrity news from SII partner New Hampshire Public Radio:

With the 2012 primary less than three weeks away, candidates for state office in New Hampshire have until midnight Wednesday to file their first campaign finance reports with the Secretary of State's office.

But if the past is any guide, the disclosures will offer a rather limited view of how political campaigns are paid for in New Hampshire. Critics say flaws in the state election statutes make it easy for corporations and other wealthy donors to exceed dollar limits on individual contributions, putting the integrity of the state's political process at risk.

Read and hear more from New Hampshire Public Radio.


State Integrity news from SII partner New Hampshire Public Radio:

The candidates for governor in New Hampshire face a deadline this week for submitting campaign finance reports to the state. So far, the candidates have raised a total of mroe than two million dollars.

That's what we know. But there’s a lot we don’t know about campaign money. Many election observers say a lot of campaign money won’t ever show up in candidate reports.

Hear more from New Hampshire Public Radio.


State Integrity news from SII partner New Hampshire Public Radio:

New Hampshire has required candidates and political committees to file periodic reports with the Secretary of State's offices for years. But in 2006, to make the process easier and more transparent, elections officials began allowing campaigns to submit their receipt and expenditure reports via the Internet.

The problem is, state election law does not require the campaigns to use the electronic filing system, so hardly any of them do.

Read more from New Hampshire Public Radio.


State integrity news for New Hamshire from SII partner New Hampshire Public Radio:

Employment Security Commissioner Tara Reardon resigned amid allegations that she hired her daughter as an intern, then had her laid off in order to receive unemployment benefits.The situation has focused attention on New Hampshire's ethics laws, which are weaker than those of many other states.

In the nationwide State Integrity Investigation, New Hampshire received an “F” in ethics enforcement.

Unlike many other states, New Hampshire does not allocate funds specifically for its ethics agency. And the state's nepotism law leaves a lot open for interpretation.

Read more from New Hampshire Public Radio.


State integrity news for New Hampshire, from Foster's Daily Democrat:

The editorial board here at Foster's Daily Democrat wholeheartedly supports imposing sanctions on those who knowingly or with disregard violate the public's right to know.

Those sanctions should include paying court costs, fines and attorney's fees for plaintiffs who win right-to-know lawsuits. Foster's also supports holding board and committee members personally responsible for likewise violating RSA 91: a. This should include similar financial sanctions as those levied on the offending board or committee, as well as possible loss of public office.

Read the rest of the story at Foster's Daily Democrat.


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