Corruption Risk Report Card
Rank among 50 states: 39th

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The story behind the score

New Mexico's governor has made ethics reform a priority, pushing tougher penalties for corruption and more disclosure. Yet the government still falls short in key areas. Read more from SII State Reporter Gwyneth Doland.

Latest state news for New Mexico

SANTA FE — On February 20, New Mexico’s House Energy and Natural Resources Committee gathered for one of its regular meetings in a drab room here at the capitol, a circular building known as the Roundhouse. On the agenda: a bill that would hike fees and penalties for energy companies drilling wells in the state.

The votes fell along party lines, with five Republicans lining up against the bill and the committee's Democratic majority voting to send the legislation to the House floor. The Republicans argued the bill would stifle business and cost jobs, and for one lawmaker, the issue hit particularly close to home. Rep. James Strickler spends most of the year running his own small oil and gas production company, JMJ Land & Minerals Co. The bill would directly affect his profits.


State integrity news for New Mexico, from the Santa Fe New Mexican:

An email obtained by a Democratic political action committee indicates state employees and computers at the Public Education Department were used to compile lists of nonunion teachers and their email addresses for Republican Gov. Susana Martinez's political director.

According to the email, sent May 2 by department spokesman Larry Behrens to political director Jay McCleskey and several government officials, the department's Information Technology Division compiled a list of all teachers and their emails. Behrens also said the department's budget staff compiled a list of which school districts have union contracts, and created a list of nonunion teachers' emails.

Read the rest of the story at the Santa Fe New Mexican.


State integrity news for New Mexico, from KUNM:

Should government information be available to the public? Which information should citizens have access to? All information? Or are there some types of government information that should remain unavailable?

New Mexico earned a D- in a recent State Integrity Investigation report on governmental accountability.

Listen to the discussion at KUNM.

 


State Integrity news for New Mexico from KUNM:

Should government information be available to the public? Which information should citizens have access to? All information? Or are there some types of government information that should remain unavailable? New Mexico earned a D- in a recent State Integrity Investigation report on governmental accountability. 

Listen to a discussion from KUNM - Albuquerque.


Corruption news for New Mexico, from the Santa Fe New Mexican:

Gov. Susana Martinez bills herself as the transparency governor, promoting her mandate that all state employee salaries be posted publicly, touting her support for a bill that would require agencies and elected bodies to post notices of their meetings 72 hours in advance and promising quick responses to requests for public records.

But open government advocates question whether Martinez (pictured, right) is walking her talk. Other than public appearances, Martinez's office has declined to publicly release information about how she spends her work days on the taxpayers' payroll.

Read the rest of the story at the Santa Fe New Mexican.


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